Category Archive News

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Can you go sober for October?

Every October Macmillan Cancer Support ask people to get involved in Sober October by going alcohol free to raise money for people with cancer but also to raise awareness of the huge benefits cutting back on booze can have!

Cutting back on the booze can be a really effective way to improve your health, boost your energy, lose weight and save money.

The NHS Better Health Campaign have a free ‘Drink Free Days’ app, allowing you to track your alcohol intake, view tips on cutting down and receive reminders when you need them most. The app is available on the app store or Google Play.

If you want to take park in Sober October visit https://www.gosober.org.uk/?no_redirect=true

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Get you know what’s normal for you this Breast Cancer Awareness Month!

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, an annual campaign to raise awareness about the importance of checking your breasts regularly and making sure you get a check-up if something doesn’t feel quite right.

Life is busy and there are a lot of important things we have to do but making sure you check your breasts should be a priority. By checking your breasts regularly, you will notice any unusual changes quickly and have the confidence to know what’s normal for you each month.

1 in 7 women in the UK will be affected by breast cancer in their lifetime with it being the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women under 40. Although mainly prominent in women, around 370 men are also diagnosed in the UK each year.

What to look out for

You should see your GP if you have:

  • A change in the size, shape or feel of one or both breasts
  • A new lump or area of thickened tissue in a breast or armpit
  • A discharge of fluid from either of your nipples
  • A lump or swelling in either of your armpits
  • A change in the look or feel of your skin, such as puckering or dimpling, a rash or redness
  • A rash (like eczema), crusting, scaly or itchy skin or redness on or around your nipple

Your symptoms are unlikely to be cancer, but it is important to get them checked by a doctor.

You can find out more information about breast cancer and how to check your breasts at the following websites:

Breast Cancer Now
Cancer Research
Coppafeel
NHS.uk

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In this together!

We want to ensure that our GP practices are safe places for everyone – that is our absolute priority and we ask that you do all you can to help us help you. Everybody needs to continue to act carefully and we thank you for your support – we’re #inthistogether. Watch this short film put together by Cheshire CCG featuring Tina Birkby a local Practice Manager and local GP, Dr Judi Price reinforcing the need to continue to stay safe and the ways that people will access general practice for the foreseeable future.

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Childhood Respiratory Conditions

Dr Ravi Jayaram has teamed up with Cheshire CCG and created a short video explaining the rise in respiratory conditions in young children and what parents should be on the lookout for! To watch the video
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CATCH App – a useful tool for anyone looking after little ones

Cheshire CCG have developed the CATCH app, a very useful tool for anyone looking after little ones.  It contains useful information about emergency care for children, services available in the local area and information on routine care such as immunizations and medication. Get it wherever you get your apps

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Pregnant? Have your Covid-19 vaccines

If you are pregnant it is important to have both doses of your Covid-19 vaccine to protect you and your unborn baby.

Covid-19 infection is currently circulating and can be serious for pregnant women. Thousands of women have been safely vaccinated in the UK and Worldwide.

Call 119 or go online to www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/coronavirus-vaccination/ to register for your vaccination appointment. You can also attend walk-in, mobile or pop up vaccination clinics in your area.

For more information on the covid-19 vaccination for women of child bearing age, pregnant or breastfeeding visit this handy guide on gov.uk

 

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MyCareView – want to see your hospital letters?

Link your NHS App log in to the new MyCareView.  You will see your hospital appointments and letters since December 2018 from Leighton and Macclesfield Hospitals.

Letter sharing is a new service and both hospitals are committed to increased sharing over the next twelve months. ECT will add outpatient appointment letters for all specialties followed by discharge letters. MCHFT aim to include outpatient appointment letters as part of their service.

Patients can now also upload their own measurements (e.g. blood pressure, weight) into MyCareView through NHS App.  This means they can track and manage their own health and wellbeing.  GP practices will not monitor or act on this information, it is for your own use only.

Patients can share their record with family or people involved in their care and can also restrict access to their data.

Click on this link to learn more about it.

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Don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

This Cervical Cancer Prevention week don’t let embarrassment stop you from getting your cervical smear test!

Cervical screening prevents 75% of cervical cancers from developing, yet one in four of those invited for a screening in the UK, don’t attend.

Cervical Screening is the method of detecting abnormal cells on the cervix. Being screened regularly means any abnormal changes in the cells can be identified and, if necessary treated to stop cancer developing.

All women and people with a cervix in the UK aged 25 to 49 are invited for a screening test every three years and those aged 50 to 64 are invited every five years.

What happens when you go for your cervical screening?

The screening test usually takes around 5 minutes to carry out.

You’ll be asked to undress from the waist down and lie on a couch, although you can remain fully dressed if you are wearing a loose skirt/dress.

The nurse or doctor will gently put an instrument called a speculum into your vagina, this holds the walls of the vagina open so the cervix can be seen.

The nurse or doctor will then use a small soft brush to gently collect some cells from the surface of your cervix. Although the procedure can be a little uncomfortable, it shouldn’t be painful. However, if you do find it painful let the doctor or nurse know as they may be able to reduce your discomfort.

Once the sample is taken, the doctor or nurse will close the curtain allowing you to dress whilst they prepare the sample to be sent off to the laboratory.

The cell sample is then sent off to a laboratory for analysis and you should receive the result within 2 weeks.

Many are nervous and embarrassed about the process of cervical screening, but there is no need to be, nurses and doctors carry out these tests every day. You are also welcome to bring a chaperone to your appointment if this would make you more comfortable.

More information about cervical screening can be found at:
NHS.UK
Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust

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It’s Diabetes Awareness Week!

This week is Diabetes Awareness Week.

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person’s blood sugar level to become too high.

There are 2 main types of diabetes

  • Type 1 – Where the body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce insulin.
  • Type 2 – Where the body does not produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells do not react to insulin.

Type 2 diabetes is far more common than type 2. In the UK, around 90% of all adults with diabetes have type 2.

Its very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as early as possible because it will get progressively worse if left untreated.

When to see a doctor

Speak to your GP if you experience the main symptoms of diabetes which includes:

  • feeling very thirsty
  • peeing more frequently than usual, particularly at night
  • feeling very tired
  • weight loss and loss of muscle bulk
  • itching around the penis or vagina, or frequent episodes of thrush
  • cuts or wounds that heal slowly
  • blurred vision

You can find diabetes advice and support at:

NHS.UK

Diabetes UK